Gone Girl

gone-girlReviews to come but we would love to hear what you have to say about this book. In the meantime, here is a clip of the film. It was a good adaptation, but nothing beats the book!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

One thought on “Gone Girl

  1. Gone Girl

    Gone Girl surprised me. Hugely. I had avoided this book for a while, partly due to the popularity it had attained, and partly due to the fact that i had heard it described as one of those books you read on holiday. I tend to avoid those books like the plague for being badly written and hugely unoriginal. This was a mistake on my part. I eventually watched the film and thoroughly enjoyed it but i thought this was due to the cast and crew – Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike and Neil Patrick Harris are actors i have been fond of for a long time, and director David Fincher is an auteur and master in his field. This was another mistake. Turns out Gone Girl is a lot more than it seems .
    This describes the plot, also. Beloved wife Amy is seemingly kidnapped on her anniversary and husband Nick is charming but dodgy enough to be a main suspect. This itself isn’t an original concept – in most crime thrillers, there is a golden rule that “it’s always the spouse”. But Gone Girl subverts this concept completely by telling the story from the perspectives of both spouses. Both of them seem lovely people…but neither of them are telling the whole story. For about half of the novel we aren’t sure if Nick is a dirtbag, if he’s being framed…OR maybe he’s a dirtbag AND he’s being framed. The change in tone about halfway through had me grinning due to the ingenius machinations of a certain character – you can tell what the character is doing, why they are doing it, hate them for it and think they are incredibly clever all at once. Gone Girl features some of the most incredible characterisation i have ever come across in a novel. I adored these people. They are real people – awful, awful people, yes. But realistic. They ARE awful, but they are also witty, funny, clever and (mostly) relatable. I loved them and hated them at the same time.
    I mentioned earlier my huge mistake in thinking Gone Girl was a “beach novel”. It is in regards to how quick and easy it is to read, but as i said, such books tend to written vapidly and without much intelligence. Not so with this book. I was rather incredulous at some of the writing – some of which is moving and some of which made me wipe my eyes as i was laughing so hard. My favourite bit of writing in the novel is thus:

    “For several years, I had been bored. Not a whining, restless child’s boredom (although I was not above that) but a dense, blanketing malaise. It seemed to me that there was nothing new to be discovered ever again. Our society was utterly, ruinously derivative (although the word derivative as a criticism is itself derivative). We were the first human beings who would never see anything for the first time. We stare at the wonders of the world, dull-eyed, underwhelmed. Mona Lisa, the Pyramids, the Empire State Building. Jungle animals on attack, ancient icebergs collapsing, volcanoes erupting. I can’t recall a single amazing thing I have seen firsthand that I didn’t immediately reference to a movie or TV show. A fucking commercial. You know the awful singsong of the blasé: Seeeen it. I’ve literally seen it all, and the worst thing, the thing that makes me want to blow my brains out, is: The secondhand experience is always better. The image is crisper, the view is keener, the camera angle and the soundtrack manipulate my emotions in a way reality can’t anymore. I don’t know that we are actually human at this point, those of us who are like most of us, who grew up with TV and movies and now the Internet. If we are betrayed, we know the words to say; when a loved one dies, we know the words to say. If we want to play the stud or the smart-ass or the fool, we know the words to say. We are all working from the same dog-eared script. It’s a very difficult era in which to be a person, just a real, actual person, instead of a collection of personality traits selected from an endless Automat of characters. And if all of us are play-acting, there can be no such thing as a soul mate, because we don’t have genuine souls. It had gotten to the point where it seemed like nothing matters, because I’m not a real person and neither is anyone else. I would have done anything to feel real again.”

    Again and again, Gone Girl pulled the rug out from underneath my feet. Just when i thought i had figured out who the characters were, another revelation staggered me and i was unsure of myself (and them) all over again. I have read many thrillers over the years and most of them are filled with the same twists and the same simplistic stories that bore and, eventually, make you hesitant towards reading more of the genre. Gone Girl has done the opposite for me – it’s made me want to seek out the diamonds in the rough.

    5 out of 5.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s